More and more often I see some more of the online mainstream finally discovering some very old news. All too often they praise it like it’s some new revelation, or like it is some miracle. Worse yet, sometimes they miss the point entirely. Case in point: Engadget recently posted about a do-it-yourself sound and light machine.

First off, Engadget takes a very strange angle on the sound and light machine and calls it a “Legal trip inducer,” which is very far from the truth. I seriously doubt, in fact I’m not even sure it is possible, that you are going to experience anything near the magnitude of an LSD trip using a simple sound and light machine. It’s a meditative aid, not some fringe drug. Engadget also seems to think that it’s dangerous when they say

“Of course, we’re still a bit hesitant to put our retinas at risk in order to legally experience hallucinations, but be sure to hit the read link for the step-by-step guide, and tap the via if you’re interested in catching a video before subjecting yourself.”

I bolded the words I found particularly ridiculous. I’m not sure if they know that you’re supposed to close your eyes during a sound and light session, but there is no risk whatsoever (assuming you’re not an epileptic, if so, then obviously this is about the last thing you want to try) unless you somehow manage to get super bright LED’s or turn up the volume ridiculously high. As if people didn’t deafen themselves other ways anyways.

I have also seen several appearances of lucid dreaming on mainstream sites like Digg, who seem to have a continuing fascination with the subject. It pops up occasionally, and half of the time the article that was submitted is from the early 90′s, or was stolen from a book in the early 90′s. Add to that the fact that the people commenting tend to have little to no clue about it, and you prove that nobody on Digg actually reads the story, or knows much about lucid dreaming.

At least more people are realizing that these socially taboo topics, which until now have languished in bleak obscurity, are “for real” and should be treated with seriousness. Even if a lot of the initial reactions are a bit ridiculous, at least there are reactions occurring.

-Hatter

Popularity: 7% [?]

StumbleUpon It!